SaaS for cash

I love Software as a Service (SaaS), but how do you persuade me to hand over the cash? First, a quick shout-out to Ellis Pratt (@ellispratt) of Cherryleaf for his recent post on SaaS… it got me thinking.

I have been working with cloud-based software products for some years. What has changed over the last few months is that I have increased the number of applications for which I am prepared to part money with on a monthly basis, in some cases as a preference over buying the software upfront. Whether it’s authoring or publishing software such as Madcap Flare’s MadPak or Adobe’s Creative Cloud, Microsoft Office 365, accounting software or contact management software, the shift to offering Software as a Service (SaaS) is well underway. Here’s Gartner’s definition and helpful links if you want some background.

It works for me because there are great products out there which suit my budget, my devices, my mobility, and my desire to always have the latest software with minimum hassle.

Clouds with price tag

However, with an increasing amount of quality free software out there, what is it that persuades me to part with my cash – even on an affordable subscription basis?

  • Sign in and trial. Ideally, I don’t want to install anything locally, especially not for a trial. And if I do, fast and painless please.
  • Stellar trial experience. First impressions count. Pull out all the stops in the trial. This might not be a time to show a “subset”. Show it all, and show it off.
  • Great design. I recently quit a trial after less than two minutes because the first new record I added felt like a task from 2004, not 2014.
  • Great ecosystem. Because I might not have a friendly account manager at my beck and call, I want a vibrant community of fellow users and experts who blog on industry topics and engage with me. People still buy from people they like.
  • Great design, again. This one is more about the user experience (UX) and information experience (IX) cross-over. The software (your company) understands the core 80% of the tasks I want to do most of the time. It makes sure those tasks are easy to do, and that I know how to do them. Do that well, and I’m prepared to cut you plenty of slack on the 20% which I occasionally have to do which are just, well, tricky.
  • Trust. I want to know that I am engaging with industry experts who know my business. I expect free, vendor independent whitepapers and research. If I see at least some of that, it builds trust and then, yes, I am prepared to part with extra cash for premium content and services such as training.
  • The odd nudge. Even mercenary cloud customers require the equivalent of a soft sales call. A good E-marketing campaign from the moment I sign up with well-placed resources (IX cross-over again) and super-easy conversion from trial options. It works if you have the preceding six items in place. It will probably be ignored without them.

And you want all that for £9.99 a month? Well, the price point varies depending on the product. But value for money is high on my agenda. Inflation is outstripping wages for the fifth year running in the UK. Unless, weirdly, you are an undertaker – for more on that, see this fascinating report from the Office for National Statistics via the BBC.

A final thought. As I read back over this list, there’s not one item which cannot be applied to on-premise software which is paid for upfront. You still have the fundamental SaaS-style expectation that, through interaction with content on your web site, social media, and in your product…

…I know, that you know, what it feels like to be your customer.

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Posted in ix, tech comms

Five help design favourites

“Is it OK to make the help button go straight to the support home page?”

It is great that you are making more of your tech comms content available online. However, jettisoning your users mid-task onto a generic landing page can be frustrating.

The Administration area of a WordPress blog has some really nice help design, which I have used in this post to demonstrate some alternatives.

Here, the help design feels:

  1. Predictable
  2. Clear
  3. Context-sensitive
  4. Linked to in-depth topics
  5. Dynamic and up-to-date

1. Predictable

The help button behaviour is predictable, before I have even selected it. The downward pointing arrow gives me the message that I am a) going to stay exactly where I am and b) going to get some expanded text or options.

Screenshot of WordPress help button

2. Clear

The word “Help” in a decent size relative to the rest of the content on the screen makes it easy to find.

3. Context-sensitive

Once I select Help, the content is contextual.

Screenshot of expanded WordPress help

4. Links to more

I also have access to general help categories. Following these links is going to take me away from the page to the support web site, but I get to a specific area I have chosen while I am still in context.

Screenshot of links in WordPress help

5. Dynamic and up-to-date

Once I select, for example, the Get Help Media category, the links I get look dynamic – updates to the WordPress Support web site may be feeding directly into the display area in help.

Do you have a help design favourite which you would like to use in a help makeover?

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Posted in ix, tech comms

The 5 minute eLearning script planner

“We want more help and training as video content, and we want it fast!”

Take a 2-3 minute “how to” tutorial video with voice over as an example. Writing a script has lots of benefits including keeping your video short and on-task. A good quality script comes from a good plan for what you want your video to achieve.

Let’s get visual

I have adapted an excellent teaching resource, The 5 minute Lesson Plan by Ross McGill (@TeacherToolkit), to plan the script. You can download the original from Ross’s blog. This is how it looks, completed, in about 5 minutes.

Image of 5-minute planner

These steps look arduous when you write them in a list, like I have below. That is the beauty of the visual style of this planner. If you respond well to the visual layout, the ideas flow quickly – we are looking for bullets and key words to crystallize your plan.

  • The BIG picture – where does this fit into the video series, learning stage, or overall theme. The big picture answer to “why should I spend 2 minutes of my time on this?”.
  • Objectives – at a lower level, what do you want this specific video to achieve, what I will have learnt after watching it?
  • Engagement – what’s the hook to keep people watching after the first few seconds?
  • Stickability – what techniques can you use to reinforce learning and make it last?
  • AfL – Stands for “assessment for learning”. How can you measure that your video has been successful and that the person watching it is in a better place after watching than before?
  • Words along the way – terminology which may be new to the audience, and/or important to the overall understanding of the topic
  • Differentiation – ignore the levels here, they relate to the UK National Curriculum. But still a good one to consider. How have you handled different levels of prior knowledge and technical ability?
  • Learning Episodes (x4) – you don’t have to use all of these. They are useful to help you to split up “concept” and “task-based” sections of the video, and can map to what you wrote in Objectives.

Moving from plan to execution

If this approach works for you, and you are using a tool like Captivate, you may want to go straight into it and write the full text for your script slide-by-slide using the Text-To-Speech/Closed Captions feature. You can then export to get the full script reviewed. Alternatively, write out the full script in a storyboard style with placeholder graphics and graphic directions.

Whichever approach you take, the idea is to refer back to your visual plan to keep your full text script as tight and relevant as it can be.

Would this planner help you? Do you have other techniques or tools which work well for you?

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Posted in elearning, tech comms

This little feature went to market – does the tech author survive or strategise?

Here’s the scenario: You have a new feature in your software on its way to market. You are the lead tech author/information designer working on it.

Do you..

a) go into survival mode?

“Must generate help pages before release date”

Or..

b) take a strategic approach?

“Remind me why we are doing this” – in a top-down approach starting with a holistic view of the customer, then narrowing to your users and content.

Taking a strategic approach

Starting with customer-centric questions. For the new feature, do you have a sense of:

  • What the demand for this feature is in the marketCustomer centric and user centric sticky notes leading to smiley face
  • How your sales channel thinks it is going to drive revenue
  • The user stories or user “pain” this is solving
  • Anticipated customer service/support issues
  • What marketing collateral and social media campaigns are planned around it
  • What the impact on training or certification programmes is

These feed into user-centric questions. For new content, which you are authoring or designing, do you have ideas for:

  • Who might be able to reuse my content
  • At what point in the customer journey is it accessed
  • What analytics and user research data do I have to inform my decisions
  • What are the relevant costs/benefits of different output types
  • Is my content going to be consumed on a mobile device
  • What can I do to promote and engage responses to my content

Or do you..

c) combine modes a) and b)?

Shifting from survival to strategic

From recent experience, my impression is that we are shifting away from survival and towards strategic. We are doing it out of necessity – driven by smaller cross-functional teams and shorter release cycles. But I hope we are also doing it by design – the content becomes more relevant, innovative and in synch with the customer’s and user’s relationship to your organisation and your software.

Did you answer a), b) or c)? Do you have any items to add to the customer- and user-centric question lists?

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Posted in tech comms
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